Coping Strategies

How to Handle Frustration and Anger-Social Dimension – 10 tips…

1/ BE AROUND POSITIVE PEOPLE

2/ PARTICIPATE IN THINGS YOU ENJOY

3/ FLEXIBILITY IS IMPORTANT IN RESPONDING TO SITUATIONS

4/ VISUALIZE CALMNESS

5/ SOMETIMES GET AWAY ALONE TO REST AND “COOL OFF”

6/ VERBALLY RECITE SOOTHING COMMENTS

7/ BE AWARE OF SITUATIONS THAT YOU KNOW WILL UPSET YOU

8/ THINK THROUGH ALL ACTIONS BEFORE DOING THEM

9/ ASK FOR HELP, ASSISTANCE BEFORE YOU GET FRUSTRATED

10/ WAIT FIFTEEN MINUTES BEFORE RESPONDING TO ANYTHING THAT BOTHERS YOU

 

 

Dr Daniel Lane on coping with PCS….

Daniel Lane

I simply can’t wait for a while before giving some more really important advice that I have always found instrumental in the recovery of all of the patients I see.

Anything that you do that doesn’t make you worse is making you stronger. What do I mean? Well, If you recall that sensory stimuli drive brain function (and plasticity) then if you can stimulate (ie. excite) your brain with sensory stimuli BUT NOT TOO MUCH AT ANY ONE TIME then your brain will respond positively and strengthen. However if you “CROSS THE LINE” and exceed your brain’s “fitness level” then you will deteriorate. This is basically the idea behind “pacing” when dealing with chronic pain (which of course is a brain-disorder).

So practically what does this mean? Well, if you find that you can get up in the morning and are okay pottering around the house for 15 minutes before you start to get worse then make sure that at 13 or 14 minutes of pottering around you STOP AND REST for a while before getting up again. In other words you are stimulating (“exercising”) your brain within its metabolic capacity stop before you cross the “invisible line” (because crossing this line results in oxidative stress). THIS APPROACH IS CRITICAL I feel when dealing with brain-disorders.

Of course the same principles apply to all other sensory stimuli such as sound and light, so if you find that you are okay with the radio on for 8 minutes but not at 10 minutes then always turn it off at 6 or 7 minutes and rest. This is like graduated and very personal brain-training. Usually people find that gradually (and sometimes very gradually) they can slowly increase the duration of sensory stimuli as they slowly improve. I hope that this makes sense. This is such an important part of recovery.

Daniel Lane

Dear All,

I will keep this post short(ish) because I realise of course that concentration/attention can be difficult. As you may know I have a special interest in the diagnosis and treatment of brain-based disorders through the activation of neuroplasticity and I have had the honour of helping people with various types of brain injuries for several years now.

You may recall that a briefly outlined the diagnostic and therapeutic approach which “Neurological Chiropractors” use when dealing with brain disorders – in summary a speciality known as Functional Neurology. I would be very happy to talk about this in further detail if people are interested.

I haven’t posted anything for ages partly because I have been overwhelmed wondering where to start…So I thought to start at the beginning!

The vast majority of people who I see with brain-injuries are finding life very tough and specifically report that generally unless they are resting in bed (in the dark and quiet) they feel worse. This is because incoming sensory stimuli such as light, sound, touch, smell and especially movement and gravity (known as vestibular and proprioceptive senses) and even some cognitive processes stimulate the brain too much (beyond its impaired metabolic capacity). Neurones are driven through anaerobic metabolic pathways which results in oxidative stress, which in turn causes a further loss of function and the individual feels and gets worse. Very similar events occur when someone is experiencing a migraine headache.

This is why it is CRITICAL to rest a lot and avoid situations (ie. stimuli) that exceed your brain’s current “fitness level”. I always find that patients that try to “soldier on” just get worse.

 So my first and most important advice is to rest as much as possible :-)

 

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Shaun of ‘Post Concussion Syndrome (PCS) Support’ gives advice on how he dealt with PCS, his own coping strategies & ideas are outlined in his Blog here :

Post Concussion Syndrome (PCS) Support – Shaun’s UK Blog

John Byler’s TBI strategies website holds much valuable information, presented in his own warm & enthusiastic style –  John Byler’s TBI Strategies Website

See the Recommended Books section for more details of John’s book…..

Dr Glen Johnson has published an online ebook all about a related issue Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) which deals more with head injury with longer periods of unconsciousness or even coma known as TBI.

Dr Glen Johnson’s TBI Guide Online Book

 

 


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